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Archive for January 13th, 2015

Model of the Titanic in the Maritime Museum of the Atlantic

Model of the Titanic in the Maritime Museum of the Atlantic

It was not until I visited Halifax that I had any idea of the connection that city has to the Titanic. Our tour bus stopped at a graveyard where victims had been recovered at sea and brought there to be buried.

Touring the graves of Titanic victims

Touring the graves of Titanic victims

The RMS Titanic left Southampton, England on April 10, 1912, on her maiden voyage. On Sunday, April 14 at 11:40 pm, the Titanic struck a giant iceberg and by 2:20 am on April 15, the “unsinkable ship” was gone. The first vessel to arrive at the scene of the disaster was the Cunard Liner RMS Carpathia and she was able to rescue more than 700 survivors.

The stone tells the story.

The stone tells the story.

On April 17, the Halifax-based Cable Steamer Mackay-Bennett set sail with a minister, an undertaker and a cargo of ice, coffins and canvas bags. Her crew was able to recover 306 bodies, 116 of which had to be buried at sea. On April 26, the Mackay-Bennett left for Halifax with 190 bodies. She was relieved by the Minia, also a Halifax-based cable ship.

Most of the gravestones, erected in the fall of 1912 and paid for by the White Star Line, are plain granite blocks. In some cases, however, families, friends or other groups chose to commission a larger and more elaborate gravestone. All of these more personalized graves, including the striking Celtic cross and the beautiful monument to the “unknown child” are located at Fairview Lawn. Click here for more information about the “unknown child”.

Click here for more details about the recovery of other victims of the Titanic.

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